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Meet the Judge Who Went Viral For His Creative Punishments

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Meet the Judge Who Went Viral For His Creative Punishments
Painesville, Ohio, Judge Michael Cicconetti say he believes in making the punishment fit the crime.

Conan's Greenland weather report cracks up Anderson Cooper

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Conan's Greenland weather report cracks up Anderson Cooper
Conan O'Brien talks with CNN's Anderson Cooper about his visit to Greenland after President Donald Trump said he wanted to buy it, and showed video of him presenting the local weather forecast in the native Greenlandic language. #Conan #AndersonCooper #CNN #News

Why Cuban cab drivers earn more than doctors

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Why Cuban cab drivers earn more than doctors
In Cuba, cab drivers are the one percent Help us make more ambitious videos by joining the Vox Video Lab. It gets you exclusive perks, like livestream Q&As with all the Vox creators, a badge that levels up over time, and video extras bringing you closer to our work! Learn more at http://bit.ly/video-lab Cuba’s economy works as a central planning model, where government ministries dole out resources and set everything from prices to inventories to salaries. The fact that a taxi driver can make so much more than a physician is a reflection of the Cuban government’s heavy focus on tourism. For years, the central planning apparatus has valued tourism as a key mechanism for both bringing in revenue as well as propagating the idea that Cuba is thriving. Many pesos are collected by the high prices on everything related to the tourism industry. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Why a storm surge can be the deadliest part of a hurricane

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Why a storm surge can be the deadliest part of a hurricane
It can start before a hurricane even makes landfall. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Storm surge, or coastal flooding, tends to be the deadliest aspect of hurricanes. As wind from the storm pushes water onshore several feet above the normal tide, it can trap people in their homes, wash away entire houses, and make rescue missions harrowing and slow. In the US, the Eastern and Southeastern coastlines are among the most vulnerable areas for storm surges. Along the East Coast, hurricane Sandy produced a massive storm surge in 2012. On the Gulf Coast, places like Galveston, Texas and New Orleans have seen multiple hurricanes so they've built some infrastructure to help defend against excessive flooding. Levees, canals and seawalls are designed to stop or redirect rising water away from cities. But even those can be inadequate, when faced with an especially strong hurricane. What really concerns experts, though, are places that don’t experience a lot of hurricanes but are still vulnerable to storm surge, like the coast of Georgia and Northern Florida. These areas have shallow water, which means sea level can rise faster and water can reach further inland making the flooding worse. But they’ve seen fewer hurricanes than the Gulf Coast and they are likely to be less prepared. So when a major hurricane like Irma hits low-lying areas like these, the storm surge can be the first and deadliest thing headed their way. Read more: http://bit.ly/32j2cYR And watch our video on how climate change contributes to the hurricanes we're now experiencing: https://youtu.be/_0TCrGtTEQM Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Why cities are full of uncomfortable benches

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Why cities are full of uncomfortable benches
That bench won't be yours forever. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO When designing urban spaces, city planners have many competing interests to balance. After all, cities are some of the most diverse places on the planet. They need to be built for a variety of needs. In recent years, these competing interests have surfaced conflict over an unlikely interest: purposefully uncomfortable benches. Enter the New York City MTA. They’ve installed 'leaning bars’ to supplement traditional benches & save platform space. But designs like this carry an often invisible cost: they rob citizens of hospitable public space. And the people who experience this cost most directly are those experiencing homelessness. A few notes of thanks: First to Historian A. Roger Ekirch who kindly got me up to speed on the expansion of streetlights in historic western city districts. Another thanks goes to author Veronica Harnish, who outlined some of the pitfalls that people experiencing homelessness face when choosing between sleeping rough or utilizing emergency shelters. You can read her blog here: http://car-living.blogspot.com/ A third thank you goes to the staff at the Unites States Interagency Council on Homelessness — they supplied the map in this video, as well as some aggregate statistics of the United States homeless population. Those numbers come from a variety of annual ‘Point-In-Time’ counts. The 2018 event will take place in late January, and the process depends on volunteers — so if you'd like to participate, you can find your local organizer here: https://www.hudexchange.info/grantees/find-a-grantee/?state=&program=on&coc=on&params=%7B%22limit%22%3A20%2C%22sort%22%3A%22%22%2C%22years%22%3A%5B%5D%2C%22searchTerm%22%3A%22%22%2C%22dir%22%3A%22%22%2C%22grantees%22%3A%5B%5D%2C%22state%22%3A%22%22%2C%22programs%22%3A%5B3%5D%2C%22coc%22%3Atrue%7D##granteeSearch Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Meet The 14-Year-Old Quantum Physics Whiz Who’s Already Graduating College | TODAY

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Meet The 14-Year-Old Quantum Physics Whiz Who’s Already Graduating College | TODAY
Carson Huey-You is only 14 years old but he will become Texas Christian University’s youngest graduate on Saturday. NBC’s Jacob Rascon reports for TODAY on the teen’s extraordinary academic story and his promising future. » Subscribe to TODAY: http://on.today.com/SubscribeToTODAY » Watch the latest from TODAY: http://bit.ly/LatestTODAY About: TODAY brings you the latest headlines and expert tips on money, health and parenting. We wake up every morning to give you and your family all you need to start your day. If it matters to you, it matters to us. We are in the people business. Subscribe to our channel for exclusive TODAY archival footage & our original web series. Connect with TODAY Online! Visit TODAY's Website: http://on.today.com/ReadTODAY Find TODAY on Facebook: http://on.today.com/LikeTODAY Follow TODAY on Twitter: http://on.today.com/FollowTODAY Follow TODAY on Google+: http://on.today.com/PlusTODAY Follow TODAY on Instagram: http://on.today.com/InstaTODAY Follow TODAY on Pinterest: http://on.today.com/PinTODAY Meet The 14-Year-Old Quantum Physics Whiz Who’s Already Graduating College | TODAY